Posts Tagged ‘ visualization ’

Circles Inside Squares

Recently, Jon and I were asked to teach the Visulaization 1 class @ SJSU Industrial Design.  It is something we both aspiring to do someday in the future…and that future is now.  We are now 3 weeks into the class and the students seem to be responding really well, and bring a positive attitude to class everyday.  Hopefully from their point of view we are able to connect, communicate, educate and inspire.  I felt like the Circles Inside Squares demo was a great spot to start with our new posts for the class (as several other components that we have taught already appear here on LW’s).  Enjoy!

First, sketch this out on a sheet of paper, cut it out and fold it up into a 6 sided cube.

Now, using your cube…sketch out what you see.  Play with Perspective Views, View Angle, Eye Level of the cube…and then freehand the ellipses on each showing side of the cube!

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Curvilinear Forms

Curvilinear Forms can be some of the toughest things to sketch in perspective, but when you nail it they can shine for you.  This technique reaches back to my first Visualization class with Dave Fleming at San Jose States Industrial Design Dept.  Follow each step, and you will learn to build 3D curvilinear forms on paper!

Curvilinear Form_1

1.  Perspective, Proportions and Connections:  Sketch your initial box forms.  Take a look at the proportions of the two boxes in relationship to each other (they are the major bodies of the object).  Once you are happy with the proportions, connect the two boxes, and find the center line of both boxes.

Curvilinear Form_2

2)  Contour lines, Center lines, Radi and More:  Use your sketch from step one asn an underlay to make the second sketch.   Lightly ghost the key points from the original sketch (as visual reference).  Start to “shape” the boxes into softer forms, paying attentions to the outside profile to maintain the correct perspective position of those curves.   Use crossing contour lines to help describe to your eye how you see those new shapes.  Add curves and Radi based off of those contour lines.  Make sure that the center lines now live on both forms.

Curvilinear Form_3

3) Final Shape, Details Texture and Preparation:  Use the sketch from step 2 to help create your final shape.  Adjust curves and contours to fit your design, always referencing your previous sketch.  Place key details that play a big part in the design on the object, always looking to see if center lines/ contour lines hit those objects (this can help play up certain details).  Always follow the surfaces you have built to make details more realistic.  Add textures if necessary to separate forms, and the sketch is prepared for value and shading!

Enjoy!

Sketch Warm Up!

Feeling tired and rusty?  Been a while since you last sketched? Need a pick-me-up, that will get your marker started?  Sketching warm ups are the best way to break that silence between your pen and paper.  It will help your brain visualize your next move and learn to build confident lines.  This technique shown here is most commonly taught at Art Center in Pasadena, and Scott Robertson being the biggest proponent!  I threw on his DVD and did a little sketch warm ups.

Click on the photo to take you over to the full Sketch Warm Up, filed under Tutorials and Techniques page!

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