Posts Tagged ‘ demo ’

Motorcycle Sketch Demo- 1968 Benelli 175cc

I have been meaning to sketch out my motorcycle (my grandpa’s old bike) for some time now.  I started with just a simple papermate fine point on marker paper with the sketch below.  Feeling out the shapes, silhouette, proportions and placement of each part.  There is lots of room in the engine area, because Benelli used this frame for 4 different size engines (125, 175, 250 and 360cc!).  Click on each image below for the step by step demonstration!

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Circles Inside Squares

Recently, Jon and I were asked to teach the Visulaization 1 class @ SJSU Industrial Design.  It is something we both aspiring to do someday in the future…and that future is now.  We are now 3 weeks into the class and the students seem to be responding really well, and bring a positive attitude to class everyday.  Hopefully from their point of view we are able to connect, communicate, educate and inspire.  I felt like the Circles Inside Squares demo was a great spot to start with our new posts for the class (as several other components that we have taught already appear here on LW’s).  Enjoy!

First, sketch this out on a sheet of paper, cut it out and fold it up into a 6 sided cube.

Now, using your cube…sketch out what you see.  Play with Perspective Views, View Angle, Eye Level of the cube…and then freehand the ellipses on each showing side of the cube!

david carradine tribute: a portrait sketch demo

Rest in peace David Carradine.  Like Jon mentioned in his tribute sketch, we lost a huge inspiration to many and a hero to all.   I decided to work this sketch in a demo format, sketching and scanning at each stage to show the progress.   I used just simple trace with black verithin-prisma.  You will be missed…

Step 1: This initial sketch is done with basic straight lines.

(A). You start by breaking the page down with lines that extend off the page.   These lines are the dominate composition lines, that help to dictate the main shapes and force of the sketch.

(B).  Next you use Medium length lines  (built off of the extended lines from A.) to help rough some of the bigger shapes, head, hands body are usually roughly formed.

(C).  Using smaller lines, you help complete some of the rough shapes and help to begin the detail elements of the sketch.

Basic line break down

Step 2:  Using the sketch from Step 1 as an underlay, here we begin a new sketch by blocking out the basic shapes.  Circles, triangles, cross section lines and roughly blocked out lines.

Primary shape sketch w/ beginning detailsStep 3:  Using the sketch from Step 2 as an underlay, we start a new sketch using the underlay as the “framework” to hang the more gestural/ expressive line work.  Here we are looking to shape most of the final details, begin to build hierarchy and contrast in the line quality and look for value shifts.  As the building of line work continues, its important to sketch “inside” the lines…using the cross section lines as reference, you can shape areas like the cheek, nose, mouth, eyes, etc.

Shaped Linework and initial shadingStep 4:  Here we have taken the sketch from Step 3, a little further with shading, cross hatching, feathering, etc.  Using different techniques to help build in value, keeps the sketch alive and dynamic.  Working with those different uses of the pencil, you can sepreate skin from cloth, etc.   Finishing the light details on the face and hands, help to finialize the sketch.  The last few details, I like to rough in a background, to help the portrait step off the page.  Hope you can get something from this technique I was taught in a Figure Drawing/Painting class.  Enjoy!

Final Sketch